Since 1983, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the Heinz School of Public Policy Management at Carnegie Mellon University offer a joint degree program leading to the two degrees of Master of Divinity (M.Div.) and Master of Science in Public Policy and Management (MSPPM).

The joint degree program seeks to prepare persons as experts in theology as well as urban policy and management in order to establish a group of specialists ready to serve the church as practitioners and consultants through a combination of competencies.

About the M.Div./MSPPM Joint Degree

Through the recognition by each institution of work performed in the other institution for advanced standing, the program can be completed in 3.5 years. Normal completion of each degree program independently would require five years. Admission is determined separately by each institution.

Internship Requirement

Joint degree students are required to complete a summer internship between their second and third semesters at the Heinz College as part of their MSPPM degree requirements. Students with more than three years of post-baccalaureate professional relevant work experience prior to enrolling at PTS (or who meet one of the other requirements for the MSPPM’s one year-year track) can petition to have the internship requirement waived.

Careers for M.Div./MSPPM Grads

The M.Div./MSPPM program prepares leaders in urban policy and management as well as theology in order to establish a group of specialists ready to serve the church as practitioners and consultants through a combination of competencies developed in the two programs.

Application Instructions

Admission to the joint program may be obtained prior to the first year of study at either school. Admission into the program is determined by each institution separately; admission into one institution does not guarantee admission to the other. Interested candidates to the joint degree program should refer to each school’s program brochures or websites for specifics on admission requirements. Prospective students should be advised that admission into the MSPPM portion of this program must take the GRE or GMAT for admission to Heinz College. Please note that the admissions deadline for the Heinz College is Jan. 10.

Inquiries concerning the MSPPM portion of the program should be directed to Carnegie Mellon University Heinz School of Public Policy and Management at 412-268-2164 or hnzadmit@andrew.cmu.edu.

M.Div./MSPPM Program Sequence

"The joint degree program has challenged me to think about the work of the church in new ways. It has given me the opportunity to dig deeper into two areas I am passionate about and interested in and to see the bridges between public policy and the work of the church. My education at PTS and Heinz instilled in me the belief that ministry is not limited simply to what we do during our 'work hours.'" - Lee Scott ’11

Pittsburgh Seminary Blog

The Fight for . . . Not Against

December 18, 2017

In the midst of polarizing political and denominational battles, the word “fight” may turn many of you away from reading this. However, the fight I’m describing has nothing to do with political rhetoric and is far removed from congregational committees and denominational commissions. It is a fight that no one will know I am in by looking at the smile on my face or by hearing the sermons that I preach. I am fighting for the life of our unborn daughter who was recently diagnosed with a critical congenital heart defect. I am not fighting the health care system nor am I at odds with insurance companies. I do not [...]

The post The Fight for . . . Not Against appeared first on Pittsburgh Theological Seminary.

Did We Really Do Things Better Back Then?

November 17, 2017

On the Field I got to the soccer field five minutes before the end of practice, in time to hear the closing strains of a plaid-skirted mother’s rant to her friend about the way they teach math these days: “So I said, why are you beginning with centimeters? How hard is it to carry the ones?” (I’m just reporting what I heard, folks, not trying to make sense of it.) At first annoyed—get over it—I then dropped my stone and let it roll away, for I’ll admit it: I do the same thing. They did everything better when we were young. In the Classroom Take teaching a kid to play the [...]

The post Did We Really Do Things Better Back Then? appeared first on Pittsburgh Theological Seminary.